WAGONS HO

WAGONS HO

Okay, my education on using the new camera is incomplete. This photo is of a moon rise over the bluffs that loom over the old Mohave-Prescott Toll Road.
As I sat in the ruts of the old road waiting for the moon to clear the ridge I listened to the coyotes howl and gave the imagination free reign. There was nothing to break the illusion that it was the 19Th century or that I was miles from civilization instead of a few blocks from Kingman and Route 66.
Counted among the many things I treasure about the deserts of the southwest are the summer evenings, warm with a soft breeze and skies so clear you often feel as though you can touch the stars.
For those motoring west on the old double 6 across the deserts I highly recommend taking part of the drive at night, stopping under the canopy of stars, and listening to the silence. Remember, watch for snakes as they like the cool evenings as well!
THE LOST YEARS

THE LOST YEARS

* click to enlarge

The Fuller brothers of Kalamazoo, Michigan, made a better than average living with the manufacture of washboards and similar products. Joining forces with the Blood brothers, owners of Kalamazoo Cycle, they diversified into automobile production in 1903.

The resultant Michigan was a short lived endeavor with about one hundred cars sold by late 1904. Counted among the one hundred owners was Buffalo Bill Cody.

One of the most overlooked epochs in American history is the period between 1895 and 1905, an era when the future was overshadowed by the past. Icons of the frontier were learning to drive automobiles, stagecoaches still operated in Arizona, outlaws on horseback were pursued by posses in automobiles, and blacksmith shops and livery stables became garages.