Another KABAM (Kingman Area Books Are Magic Festival) is now history and indications are it was a rousing success with plans underway to make next year an even larger event. Authors, artists, and poets from throughout the country, as well as one from England, performed, displayed their work, and took the message that books are magic into area schools.
http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=1968adventurer&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=0760338434&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrFor me there was an added bonus, a visit from John Springs and his wife Judy. This charming couple is rapidly becoming the face that represents a new era on Route 66 as they have boldly launched an on line publication, the first of its kind, with a primary focus being an opportunity for the small buinesses, the heart and soul of this highway, and the museums along the route to garner international exposure. You can check out the premier issue here.
Ghost Towns of Route 66 is going out to those who preordered on Amazon, to select media outlets for review, and to book stores and gift shops even though the official kick off for the tour is at the 2011 International Route 66 Festival in Amarillo in June. Even though I have confidence that the book is well researched and the photography is excellent as a result of Kerrick James artistry, there is always an apprehension on how a book will be received.
Initial indications are these concerns are without merit. The Route 66 Association of Arizona gift shop in the Power House visitor center in Kingman sold almost their entire order in one day.
Amazon.com is apparently selling them like hotcakes. #11 in Books > Travel > United States > Regions > Midwest #61 in Books > Travel > United States > Regions > South
One aspect of writing that I truly enjoy is that it allows me to share, to provide context, and, in regard to books written on travel related subjects, to enhance an adventurers experience. In Ghost Towns of Route 66, I was able to do all of this by bringing to light the stories of towns where the resurgent interest in Route 66 came to late, places where that legendary highway will always be Main Street.
http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=1968adventurer&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=0760332215&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrSpeaking of books, and while I am on the subject of shameless self promotion, Ghost Towns of the Southwest is selling well enough to warrant another printing. This book is available through Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble, other book stores, and at the Power House Visitor Center in Kingman.
This old road is, and always has been, in a state of flux. Two of the most recent items of note include the sale of the iconic Blue Swallow motel in Tucumcari and the announcement that the Midpoint Cafe in Adrian, Texas is going up for sale.
Now, a few quick items of note pertaining to Route 66 in the Kingman area. My office/museum and unofficial visitor center continues to expand its offerings. In addition to the growing collection of historic automotive advertisement and rental cars, I can now offer official Arizona highway maps at no charge, free Kingman post cards, Kingman area visitors guides, a wide array of brochures for sites along Route 66 from the Wigwam Motel in Rialto to Afton Station, and, dependant on availability, free passes to area museums as well as signed copies of most of my books.
If you would like your brochures displayed drop me a note. The only cost is an agreement to display a few from the Kingman area in your facilitiy.
Last but not least I would like to call your attention to a relatively recent addition to the attractions found along our section of Route 66, Seligman Sundries. Check out their site from this link and them to your list of must see attractions and stops.

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