ANCIENT HISTORY, ROUTE 66 UPDATES, AND PENDING ROAD TRIPS

As it is a holiday weekend, I will keep things short today. Still, I am quite sure you might find a few of the topics presented for discussion of interest.

We will start with a Route 66 update. Sam Frisher, the owner of the historic El Trovatore Motel in Kingman, is moving closer to the launch of a tour company that will specialize in Route 66 related day trips centered on Kingman.
The first promotional trip to Seligman, with stops at the Grand Canyon Caverns and the Hackberry General Store, along Route 66 is being scheduled for the 15th of this month. Seating is limited and invitations are being sent to local journalists as well as business and civic leaders.
If your interested in this tour, would like to schedule a tour for your group, or would like to make a reservation for a tour to Seligman, or forthcoming tours under development, contact Sam at the El Trovatore Motel. The primary tour package will include a room at the historic motel as well as breakfast at the Hot Rod Cafe. Here is a link for the motel website with contact information. 
The rapidly changing schedule for our pending road trip east on Route 66 in October is making the anticipation almost unbearable. Of course the center piece of the grand adventure will be Cuba Fest in Cuba, Missouri where John and Judy Springs of 66 The Mother Road will announce the winners of the Big Palooza Contest (register today, winner need not be present to win) and where we will unveil the Route 66 Encyclopedia.
We will also be making informal stops to sign books at Mr. C’s in Lebanon, Henry’s Rabbit Ranch, and the National Route 66 Museum in Elk City, Oklahoma. On the afternoon of the 14th we will be the featured guests for a meet and greet at Bob Lile’s new gallery on 6th Street (Route 66) in Amarillo.
Now, something a bit more personal. Family reunions and similar clan activities were never a part of my youth. In part this was resultant of how scattered the family was, especially on dad’s side. Another reason was the almost ridiculous longevity of his side of the family that resulted in some very odd family dynamics.
Case in point, my grandfather, Frederick P. Hinckley, who passed away shortly before I was born. He was born in 1866, my father in 1928.
Over the years I have collected bits of family history here and there, a venture that may have been the catalyst for my fascination with history. As there were so many gaping holes in the Hinckley family saga curiosity fueled these bouts of research.
I can date the launch of this voyage of discovery to the year 1971 when my grandmother passed away and we began cleaning out the attic of the house at 612 Hinckley Boulevard in Summit Township, Michigan. Being an inquisitive child I had asked questions before this date (when was this picture of Henry Ford and grandfather on the front porch taken?) but seldom received answers as the past was the past in my family.
As the years passed I pieced together an incomplete but fascinating history of my grandfather – a machinist at David Buick’s shop in Jackson, a prolific inventor, businessman, investor, property developer – but always seemed to come up with three questions for every answer.
He was involved with an amusement park at Vandercook Lake, had various unknown business interests in California and Florida during the teens and twenties but preferred to drive rather than take the train, and worked on special projects for Henry Ford at the machine shop and mill on the hand dug mill race at Vandercook Lake. How is this related to Route 66 you may ask?
Well, now I have learned that he was also running for county road superintendent in the early 1920s, and had been involved with a wide array of road improvement and development projects during the teens. His endeavors were not limited to Michigan.
So, as he was involved with the good roads movement and as he often drove to California, my guess would be he utilized what is now US 12 to Chicago, and then the National Old Trails Highway, later Route 66. Adding weight to this was the recent discovery of garage and repair receipts, 1919 and 1920, from Los Angeles and Tulsa.
Here is a bit of the dry bones. If anyone has information to fill a few holes in the story, please let me know.

Father James Dwight Hinckley b. 25 Feb 1830, d. 17 Apr 1904
Mother Sarah Buck b. 12 Jun 1830
Frederick P. Hinckley was born in July 1866 at Michigan. Fred Hinckley (given age 4) was listed as a household member living with Jas. D. Hinckley (given age 40) on the 1870 Census on 22 June 1870 at Adrian, Lenawee County, Michigan.1 Frederick P. Hinckley (given age 14) was listed as the son of J. D. Hinckley (given age 50) on the 1880 Census recorded 8 June 1880 at Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan.2
At age 21, Frederick P. Hinckley married first Hellen Abbott, age 19, daughter of (?) Abbott and Elizabeth (?), on Wednesday, 5 October 1887 Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan.3
The 1900 US Census enumerated him as Fred P. Hinckley (given age 33), the head of household at 304 West Morrell Street, Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan, on 1 June 1900. Also living in the household was, his daughter, Fern Hinckley (given age 11) . Fred was employed as a Machinist.4
The 1910 US Census enumerated him as Fred P. Hinckley (given age 43), the head of household at Summit Township, Jackson County, Michigan, on 6 May 1910. Also living in the household were his wife, Helen Hinckley (given age 41), his daughter, Fern H. Hinckley (given age 21), his mother-in-law, Elizabeth Abbott (given age 78) .5
The 1920 US Census enumerated him as Fred P. Hinckley (given age 53), the head of household at 410 Hinckley Road, Summit Township, Jackson County, Michigan, on 6 February 1920. Also living in the household was his wife, Helen Hinckley (given age 51). Fred was employed as a Manufacturer of Machinery.6
At age 58, Frederick P. Hinckley married second Eugenia White, age 37 on Thursday, 25 September 1924 at Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan.3
The 1930 US Census enumerated him as Fred Hinckley (given age 63), the head of household Summit Township, Jackson County, Michigan, on 6 April 1930. Also living in the household were his wife, Eugenia Hinckley (given age 42), his sons, Wiliam Hinckley (given age 4 years 5 months) and Robert Hinckley (given age 2 years 2 months) . Fred was employed as the Proprietor of a Maunfacurer of Air Machines.7
Frederick P. Hinckley and Eugenia Hinckley lived in 1936 at 612 Hinckley Boulevard, Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan.8
Frederick P. Hinckley and Eugenia Hinckley lived in 1938 Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan. Frederick was employed as the President of Hinckleyway Products Co., Inc. at 4008 Francis Avenue.8
Frederick P. Hinckley and Eugenia Hinckley lived in 1939 Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan. Frederick was employed as the President of Hinckleyway Products Co., Inc. at 4008 Francis Avenue.8
Frederick P. Hinckley and Eugenia Hinckley lived in 1940 Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan.8
Frederick P. Hinckley and Eugenia Hinckley lived in 1941 Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan. Frederick was employed as the President of Hinckley Mfg. Co. at 4008 Francis Avenue.8
Frederick P. Hinckley and Eugenia Hinckley lived in 1942 Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan. Frederick was employed as the President of Hinckley Mfg. Co. at 4008 Francis Avenue.8
Frederick P. Hinckley and Eugenia Hinckley lived in 1943 Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan.8
Frederick P. Hinckley and Eugenia Hinckley lived in 1945 Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan.8
Frederick P. Hinckley and Eugenia Hinckley lived in 1947 Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan.8

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