Meet Dino

You meet the most fascinating people on a Route 66 adventure. That, I suppose, is the magic that makes this old road so popular. This is why the iconic double six is so appealing to an international audience.

This past Sunday my dearest friend and I set out on a date. We never need an excuse for a road trip or for a date but the pretext for the little adventure was to deliver signed copies of books to the Antares Point Visitor Center about 20 miles east of Kingman on Route 66. In recent years this old place has become internationally recognized as the home of Giganticus Headicus that was created by Gregg Arnold. The misplaced Easter Island Head has become quite an attraction.

A year or so ago John McEnulty of Grand Canyon Caverns acquired the property and has slowly been rolling back the hands of time. The old restaurant and gas station that opened in 1964 now houses a delightful cafe as well as tasteful gift shop that features my books as well as my dearest friends photography. Also on display is a model of the Twin Arrows Trading Post created by Dutch artist Willem Bor. And of course, just as when it first opened, the major attraction is a dining room with million dollar views of the sweeping Hualapai Valley. (more…)

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Changing Times

Buffalo Bill Cody at the tiller of a 1904 Michigan

It was a time of incredible transition. In the Arizona territory Geronimo was being pursued by the United States Army. Meanwhile in Michigan, Ransom E. Olds was tinkering with contraptions that would soon contribute to one greatest societal changes in world history. A few years later, in 1892, he detailed a few of his endeavors, and his vision for the future, in an an interview published in Scientific American. He was quoted as saying about the automobile that, “…it never kicks or bite, never tires on long runs, and never sweats in hot weather. It does not require care in the stable and only eats while on the road.”

Peerless, a company that would rise to prominence as one of the nations leading manufacturers of luxury automobiles during the teens had its origins in the production of clothes wringers. With the explosion of bicycle popularity in the last decade of the 19th century, the company diversified production to include the two-wheelers for which America had developed an insatiable appetite.

Pierce-Arrow, another leader in the manufacture of American luxury cars during the teens, had as a cornerstone Heintz, Pierce & Munschauer, a manufacturer of iceboxes, birdcages, and other assorted household goods. As with Peerless, the manufacture of bicycles served as the interim step toward automobile production, and by the teens Pierce-Arrow challenged Rolls Royce for international dominance of the luxury automobile market. (more…)

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