Changing Times

Changing Times

Buffalo Bill Cody at the tiller of a 1904 Michigan

It was a time of incredible transition. In the Arizona territory Geronimo was being pursued by the United States Army. Meanwhile in Michigan, Ransom E. Olds was tinkering with contraptions that would soon contribute to one greatest societal changes in world history. A few years later, in 1892, he detailed a few of his endeavors, and his vision for the future, in an an interview published in Scientific American. He was quoted as saying about the automobile that, “…it never kicks or bite, never tires on long runs, and never sweats in hot weather. It does not require care in the stable and only eats while on the road.”

Peerless, a company that would rise to prominence as one of the nations leading manufacturers of luxury automobiles during the teens had its origins in the production of clothes wringers. With the explosion of bicycle popularity in the last decade of the 19th century, the company diversified production to include the two-wheelers for which America had developed an insatiable appetite.

Pierce-Arrow, another leader in the manufacture of American luxury cars during the teens, had as a cornerstone Heintz, Pierce & Munschauer, a manufacturer of iceboxes, birdcages, and other assorted household goods. As with Peerless, the manufacture of bicycles served as the interim step toward automobile production, and by the teens Pierce-Arrow challenged Rolls Royce for international dominance of the luxury automobile market. (more…)

Albuquerque To Gallup; 174 Miles In 13 Hours

Albuquerque To Gallup; 174 Miles In 13 Hours

There were only 4,250 automobile owners in New Mexico at the time.

Kingman, Arizona

The National Old Trails Highway at the dawning of Route 66 in Kingman, Arizona

The covered wagon and horseback were still the favored mode of transportation in the state of New Mexico as well as in Arizona, its neighbor to the west. Both states had entered the union in 1912 just four years prior. And yet both states were garnering headlines for some pretty spectacular automotive events. They were also attracting a growing number of tourists, including Emily Post and Edsel Ford, that traveled to and through the state by automobile, many on the National Old Trails Road. It was an era of transition, to say the very least.  (more…)