Before It Was Route 66

Before It Was Route 66

Before it was certified as U.S. 66, and long before it was

Black & Ellis

This photo of the first Packard dealership in Kingman is courtesy the Mohave Museum of History & Arts.

internationally recognized as a symbol of the quintessential American road trip, the ultimate expression of freedom that is found on the open road, the highway that would become known as Route 66 was a series of trails. They were given names and associations of boosters developed signage, performed road maintenance on occasion, and actively promoted to attract the growing legion of tourists that were traveling by automobile.    (more…)

Albuquerque To Gallup; 174 Miles In 13 Hours

Albuquerque To Gallup; 174 Miles In 13 Hours

There were only 4,250 automobile owners in New Mexico at the time.

Kingman, Arizona

The National Old Trails Highway at the dawning of Route 66 in Kingman, Arizona

The covered wagon and horseback were still the favored mode of transportation in the state of New Mexico as well as in Arizona, its neighbor to the west. Both states had entered the union in 1912 just four years prior. And yet both states were garnering headlines for some pretty spectacular automotive events. They were also attracting a growing number of tourists, including Emily Post and Edsel Ford, that traveled to and through the state by automobile, many on the National Old Trails Road. It was an era of transition, to say the very least.  (more…)